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The 3rd Grade Thinking and Doing Team, from left to right: Briana Truitt, Kaleb Brown, Ian Sykes, Sunny Hawes
January 14, 2015

Four third graders researched the important role of honey bees in agriculture and mounted a local public awareness and fundraising campaign to support bee health.

December 5, 2014

This is the 12th, and final, short news article written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

Image: Margaret Douglas/Penn State
December 4, 2014

Insecticides aimed at controlling early-season crop pests, such as soil-dwelling grubs and maggots, can increase slug populations, thus reducing crop yields, according to researchers at Penn State and the University of South Florida.

mage: Greg Hoover
November 17, 2014

People seeing the spotted lanternfly for the first time are struck by its sometimes-flashy appearance. But don't let its colorful, butterfly-like veneer fool you, caution entomologists in Penn State's College of Agricultural Sciences.

November 14, 2014

This is the 11th of twelve short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

An adult female (right) and male (left) spotted lanternfly
November 10, 2014

The spotted lanternfly is native to China, India, Japan, and Vietnam and has been detected for the first time in the United States in eastern Berks County, Pennsylvania.

Credit: Daniel Schmehl, University of Florida
November 3, 2014

Feeding honey bees a natural diet of pollen makes them significantly more resistant to pesticides than feeding them an artificial diet, according to a team of researchers, who also found that pesticide exposure causes changes in expression of genes that are sensitive to diet and nutrition.

November 3, 2014

The Schilder Laboratory at the Penn State University Departments of Entomology & Biology is seeking graduate students interested in understanding mechanisms that control phenotypic plasticity in insect locomotion and metabolism.

October 29, 2014

It may not come as a surprise that the “Green Mountain State” of Vermont is considered one of America’s greenest regions, in terms of its carbon footprint, energy efficiency, and air quality. If our Research On The Road trip to Vermont earlier this month is any barometer, let’s add bees to the list of things that matter deeply to Vermonters.

October 24, 2014

This is the 10th of twelve short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

October 17, 2014

In 2014, the Entomological Society of America (ESA) formed a program to support and develop scientists as visible and effective advocates for entomology and entomological research. The program will accept five new Fellows each year to serve two-year terms.

October 16, 2014

Patty Satalia and guest experts Andrew Read and Jose Stoute look at the return of preventable diseases.

Picture of baby barnacles dispersing from an infected male sheep crab by Anand Varma
October 15, 2014

To Kelli Hoover and David Hughes of Penn State University and their colleagues, the climbing behavior of the caterpillars seemed like an exquisite example of an extended phenotype. By causing their hosts to move up in trees, the baculoviruses increased their chances of infecting a new host down below. To test Dawkins’s idea, they examined the genes in baculoviruses, to see if they could find one that controlled the climbing of caterpillars.

October 9, 2014

On the next installment of WPSU-TV's "Conversations LIVE," disease experts Andrew F. Read and Dr. Jose A. Stoute will discuss the return of preventable diseases, the rise in drug resistant super-bugs and the evolution of new contagious outbreaks. Read and Stoute will join veteran host Patty Satalia for the discussion.

October 3, 2014

This is the 9th of twelve short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

Image: Michael Domingue/Penn State
September 24, 2014

Using bio-replication to create fake Emerald Ash Borer females to trap the male pests

An emerald ash borer rests on a leaf. Image: Jonathan Lelito/BASF Corporation
September 16, 2014

An international team of researchers has designed decoys that mimic female emerald ash borer beetles and successfully entice male emerald ash borers to land on them in an attempt to mate, only to be electrocuted and killed by high-voltage current.

September 12, 2014

This is the 8th of twelve short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

August 28, 2014

This is the 7th of twelve short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

Photo by Alexander Wild. http://www.alexanderwild.com
August 20, 2014

A parasitic fungus that must kill its ant hosts outside their nest to reproduce and transmit their infection, manipulates its victims to die in the vicinity of the colony, ensuring a constant supply of potential new hosts, according to a new study published in PLOS ONE.