Center for Pollinator Research

The Center for Pollinator Research at Pennsylvania State University is committed to developing and implementing integrative, multidisciplinary approaches to improving pollinator health, conservation, and management for ecosystems services through research, education, outreach and policy.

Spotlight

Beescape
Get a bee's eye view of your landscape.
The Pennsylvania Pollinator Protection Plan (P4)
The P4 provides recommendations for best practices and resources to support and expand pollinator populations.
Beekeeping 101 Online Course
Whether you are an experienced beekeeper, a new beekeeper, or thinking about starting a backyard beehive, Penn State Beekeeping 101 is a one-of-a-kind completely online learning experience.
Pollinator Garden Certification
Certify your pollinator-friendly garden with the Penn State Master Gardeners.

Center News

Bumble bees foraging on pumpkin blossom.
Wild bees provide a bigger slice of the pie in pumpkin pollination
January 24, 2020
Pumpkin growers frequently rent managed honeybee colonies to pollinate their crops, but a recent study published in the Journal of Economic Entomology suggests wild bees may be able to do the job just as well and for free. During a three-year study, researchers at Penn State found that bumble bees and squash bees, alone, could meet the pollination demands for sufficient pumpkin production in wholesale commercial fields in Pennsylvania.
New Study Identifies Ornamental Nursery Plants Used by Honey Bees for Pollen
January 24, 2020
The nursery industry sells over $4.3 billion worth of ornamental plants in the United States each year, representing a tremendous investment in the appearance of our managed landscapes. Current concerns about the health of pollinators generally, and honey bees in particular, raise the question – Are we helping honey bees with the flowering ornamental plants we choose? Beekeepers have honey bee hives in a range of suburban, urban, and rural environments, and honey bees in mostly managed landscapes could be using the flowering plants we choose as a source of food.
One of the most common North American bumble bee species is actually two species
January 22, 2020
Bumble bees are some of our most abundant and recognizable pollinators, essential for the pollination of many native flowering plant species. As such, the diversity of bumble bees has a long history of study by both professionals and amateurs. Because of such extensive study, it is felt that new species of bumble bees are unlikely to be found. Outstanding controversies remain, however, in what comprises a given bumble bee species.

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