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NABIL K. MARK — CDT photo
July 7, 2014

Frazier, a Penn State senior extension associate with the university’s Center for Pollinator Research, is part of a team of scientists studying the effects of pesticides on honeybee colonies.

Image: Nancy Ostiguy/Penn State
July 2, 2014

An international team of researchers has discovered honey bee colonies in Newfoundland, Canada, that are free of the invasive parasites that affect honey bees elsewhere in the world. The populations offer a unique opportunity to investigate honey bee health, both with and without interfering interactions from parasites.

A butterfly is attracted to a flower in the Pollinator Garden at The Arboretum at Penn State. Image: Nick Sloff
July 1, 2014

After a long winter, summer finally has arrived. And with the new season comes the activity of pollinators -- birds, bees, butterflies and more.

Bees cluster on the hand of Bernardo Niño, senior research technologist in Grozinger Lab at Penn State. Credit: Bernardo Niño.
May 22, 2014

Parasites, lack of food, cold snaps, pesticides, and poor management all can stress honeybee colonies, making it difficult to pin their collapse on a single source. However, in controlled field tests, honeybee colonies show evidence of Allee effects (a positive correlation between population size and individual fitness) and tipping points that are early warning indicators of collapse, MIT physics graduate student Lei Dai says.

Photo by M. Seetin
May 12, 2014

Recently, there has been a lot of press related to pollinator health, and some troubling information indicates that certain fungicides, when used during bloom, can negatively affect the health of honey bees. This is a complicated problem with the solutions relying on understanding the detailed relationships among chemicals, pollinators and pest management needs. It is not prudent to treat this topic with a broad brush with statements such as "All neonicotinoid insecticides are bad for all pollinator species," or "No fungicides should be sprayed during bloom." Research is on-going, and we do not know all of the details yet.

African honey bee, Apis mellifera scutellata, on ornamental succulent, Kitui, Kenya. Image: Maryann Frazier/Penn State
April 24, 2014

Several parasites and pathogens that devastate honeybees in Europe, Asia and the United States are spreading across East Africa, but do not appear to be impacting native honeybee populations at this time, according to an international team of researchers.

April 18, 2014

Collapse of honeybee colonies may be caused by a number of factors. Christina Grozinger and her colleagues at Penn State's Center for Pollinator Research are looking for answers and we'll talk about some upcoming research on Food and Farm on America's Web Radio, brought to you by Feedstuffs FoodLink and Feedstuffs FoodLink - Connecting Farm to Fork

hoto by Stephen Ausmus, courtesy of USDA-ARS
April 18, 2014

Regarding the challenges of the continuing decline of pollinators, Dr. Christina Grozinger said, "There is no one solution." Grozinger is a professor of entomology and director of the Center for Pollinator Research at Penn State University.

PHOTOGRAPH BY ALBERT DE WILDE/ BULTEN-BEELD/ MINDEN PICTURES, CORBIS
April 17, 2014

Bees in Kenya stay healthy despite parasites and viruses that collapse U.S. and European hives.

Victoria Bolden
April 7, 2014

Victoria Bolden is the recipient of the 2014 Dutch Gold Scholarship in Honey Bee Health. Victoria is a senior undergraduate student, with a major in Horticulture and a minor in Entomology. Victoria has extensive experience in garden design and maintenance, and is interested in designing pollinator friendly gardens to conserve and expand pollinator communities. The Dutch Gold Scholarship will support her research efforts identifying attractive native plant species for honey bees.

March 4, 2014

Scientists in the Center for Pollinator Research at Penn State have received three grants from the United States Department of Agriculture and National Science Foundation to study various threats to honey bees, including disease, pesticides, and the extinction and invasion of other species into their habitats.

March 4, 2014

Last summer, Finian Stroup was inspired to save the bees. She read the Time Magazine cover article describing the massive losses of honey bee colonies around the world, and knew that she could make a difference. And in just a few months, the eight year old raised over $1000 to help support research on honey bee health, while also raising awareness of the plight of bees in her community.

Image: Maryann Frazier/Penn State
January 28, 2014

Four pesticides commonly used on crops to kill insects and fungi also kill honeybee larvae within their hives, according to Penn State and University of Florida researchers. The team also found that N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) -- an inert, or inactive, chemical commonly used as a pesticide additive -- is highly toxic to honeybee larvae.

December 12, 2013

Maryann Frazier from Penn State University talks about how tree fruit growers can help honeybee populations by reducing pesticides and fungicides at the 2013 Great Lakes Expo in Grand Rapids, Michigan, on Dec. 10, 2013. (TJ Mullinax/Good Fruit Grower magazine)

(Photo Credit) Bernardo Niño
November 13, 2013

Queen bees convey honest signals to worker bees about their reproductive status and quality, according to researchers at Penn State, North Carolina State University and Tel Aviv University, who say their findings may help to explain why honey bee populations are declining.

September 17, 2013

Penn State researchers have demonstrated that there are significant differences in the toxicity of pesticides to honey bees and orchard bees, and found that commonly applied mixtures of pesticides are substantially more toxic than individual pesticides.

September 6, 2013

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. – The majority of our agricultural crops depend on pollinators, however pollinators are facing a number of stressors in their environment. These stressors and approaches to mitigating their effects were the focus of the 2nd International Conference on Pollinator Biology, Health and Policy held recently at Penn State.

June 13, 2013

“To the bee, a flower is a fountain of life, and to the flower, a bee is a messenger of love,” wrote poet Kahlil Gibran. Whether or not love is involved in the exchange, the evolutionary dance between pollen-transporting honey bees and nectar-producing flowers is one of nature’s most extraordinary symbiotic relationships, a hundred million years in the making.