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April 19, 2017

For animals that hibernate, making it to spring is no small feat. Torpor — the state of reduced bodily activity that occurs during hibernation — is not restful. By the time they emerge, hibernating animals are often sleep-deprived: Most expend huge bursts of energy to arouse themselves occasionally in the winter so their body temperatures don’t dip too low. This back-and-forth is exhausting, and hibernators do it with little to no food and water. By winter’s end, some have shed more than half their body weight.

April 18, 2017

Entomologists Dr. Christina Grozinger and Dr. John Tooker are tonight’s speakers at Science On Tap, sponsored by the PSU Science Policy Society. It takes place at 7 pm at Liberty Craft House. Grozinger and Tooker joined Karly Regan on the Mixtape to talk about saving pollinators and reducing pesticide use.

March 27, 2017

Last year the U.S. lost a mind-boggling 44 percent of its honeybee colonies. Certain bee species — including the rusty-patched bumblebee and Hawaiian yellow-faced bees — are on the brink of extinction. Even "Buzz the Bee" disappeared from Honey Nut Cheerios boxes earlier this month because General Mills decided removing the familiar mascot could help spotlight the problem.

March 3, 2017

A core set of genes involved in the responses of honey bees to multiple diseases caused by viruses and parasites has been identified by an international team of researchers. The findings provide a better-defined starting point for future studies of honey-bee health, and may help scientists and beekeepers breed honey bees that are more resilient to stress.

March 2, 2017

Over the past four years, Project ICP has partnered with specialty crop growers across the country to carry out on-farm research on the pollination and yield of fruit, nut, and vegetable crops. Many of these growers, including Brian Campbell of Brian Campbell Farms in central Pennsylvania, are going beyond the scope of Project ICP’s research to test and implement innovative practices to improve crop pollination – and their bottom line.

February 17, 2017

KERN COUNTY, Calif. — A soft light was just beginning to outline the Tejon Hills as Bret Adee counted rows of wizened almond trees under his breath.

February 16, 2017

A unique teacher professional development experience for middle and high school teachers. July 24-28, 2017

February 7, 2017

The president’s early actions have created uncertainty for the country’s scientists, and could be standing in the way of important research.

January 25, 2017

A common pesticide additive, known as an "inert" ingredient, could be one of the causes of the die-offs beekeepers have observed in their hives. Christopher Intagliata reports.

January 18, 2017

We have had a very productive and exciting year at the CPR! Please enjoy a copy of our 2016 newsletter, with highlights of the great research, education and extension projects we have led, and the students and postdocs who made this work possible! Special thanks to Katy Evans and Philip Moore for compiling this.

January 17, 2017

A chemical that is thought to be safe and is, therefore, widely used on crops — such as almonds, wine grapes and tree fruits — to boost the performance of pesticides, makes honey bee larvae significantly more susceptible to a deadly virus, according to researchers at Penn State and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

December 19, 2016

A new Penn State project aimed at improving the food system in East Africa by enhancing pollination services and promoting bee-derived products has received a Food Systems Innovation Grant from the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation, based at Michigan State University.

December 7, 2016

Neonicotinoids -- the most widely used class of insecticides -- significantly reduce populations of predatory insects when used as seed coatings, according to researchers at Penn State. The team's research challenges the previously held belief that neonicotinoid seed coatings have little to no effect on predatory insect populations. In fact, the work suggests that neonicotinoids reduce populations of insect predators as much as broadcast applications of commonly used pyrethroid insecticides.

November 29, 2016

Do you know where your food comes from? If you enjoy crisp apples, juicy tomatoes, and plump berries, thank a farmer, thank a scientist, and thank a bee. We need strong, healthy and diverse bee populations to provide pollination for us to eat our most healthful foods. While we can all thank a bee, the Penn State undergraduate students who received the 2016 Apes Valentes Undergraduate Research awards directly contributed to our understanding of how to keep bees healthy.

November 29, 2016

What made these women strap on bee bonnets and venture into the world of another species? An undergraduate research project examines the sting of undervalued gender-related labor.

November 22, 2016

The IPE program will train graduate Fellows to holistically tackle issues in pollinator health and ecology. Fellows will develop integrative research, education and outreach programs that span multiple disciplines - from genomics to land management – and interface with diverse stakeholder groups. Fellows will develop skills to respond to current and emerging challenges in pollinator health, sustainable, agriculture and conservation.

November 17, 2016

Sarah McTish, a senior in Agriculture Sciences, minor in Entomology at Penn State, and current Pennsylvania Honey Queen was awarded the 2016 Dutch Gold Honey Scholarship. Thanks to the generous donation of William and Kitty Gamber from Dutch Gold Honey in Lancaster PA, undergraduate students each year are afforded the opportunity to work in a premier honey bee research lab and receive a scholarship.

November 3, 2016

In 2005, New York City officials discovered Asian long-horned beetles in Central Park elms. To combat these pernicious pests, which can destroy entire forests, park personnel sprayed insecticides known as neonicotinoids on tens of thousands of trees infested by that beetle and another invasive pest, known as the emerald ash borer.

October 25, 2016

The "Great Insect Fair" at Penn State is a great way to explore the natural world and learn about the role bugs play in the ecosystem and the food chain.