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May 24, 2016

Bees and bee health are still making headlines, and sorely needed research results are finally starting to emerge. In early May, Horticultural Research Institute participated in a research symposium at Penn State University where early results from several research projects relevant to pollinator health were shared.

May 13, 2016

An insect never before found in the Western Hemisphere has been discovered in Pennsylvania, and agriculture officials are asking growers and home gardeners to help monitor and manage the new invasive pest.

May 13, 2016

This is the 7th of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

May 6, 2016

This talk given at a recent workshop of the Global Center for Food Systems Innovation is notable for what it borrows. The innovation is the use of cell phones in a way that enables African beekeepers to share data. My favorite line comes early in the piece.

May 6, 2016

Penn State’s Maryann Frazier and her team use cell phones to improve honey production. Project managers weekly call a network of Kenyan beekeepers to discuss best practices for the highest honey production that maximizes income.

April 29, 2016

This is the 6th of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

April 27, 2016

Spring is a season of new growth, with buds on the trees, green grass, and flowers beginning to bloom. It’s also a prime time for pollinators such as honey bees, as they begin to feed off of the pollen from the newly blooming flora.

April 26, 2016

Penn State’s Center for Pollinator Research is the bee’s knees. Committed to studying the factors impacting pollinator health and developing and implementing creative approaches to pollinator conservation, the center is on the front lines of a fight to help the hard-working honeybee that along with other insects pollinates three-fourths of America’s crops.

April 26, 2016

Since the time she was 8 years old—after attending the College of Agricultural Sciences’ Great Insect Fair—Sarah McTish knew she wanted to study entomology at Penn State.

April 19, 2016

Christina Grozinger, professor of entomology in the College of Agricultural Sciences, has been named a Distinguished Professor by Penn State, and she also has been chosen to receive the college's 2016 Alex and Jessie C. Black Award for Excellence in Research.

April 15, 2016

This is the 5th of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

April 11, 2016

The allium leafminer (also known as the onion leafminer) has recently been detected and confirmed from infested leeks and onions in Lancaster County. This is the first confirmed infestation in the Western Hemisphere. Your assistance is needed for monitoring and controlling this new invasive species.

April 7, 2016

Next time you chew a stick of mint gum or pop a peppermint candy, think of insects. That distinctive flavor comes from essential oils the mint plant makes to defend itself against hungry insects. Strong flavors and smells of other plants, such as basil and cabbage, are also plant defense compounds. These weapons halt insect feeding in many ways. Plant compounds can taste or smell bad, fortify cell walls so insects can’t penetrate a leaf to feed, or affect digestion, eventually killing the attackers. But insects aren’t helpless against these plant defenses. They find ways to fight back — and one of their best weapons is their spit.

April 6, 2016

This issue features a small urban pollinator garden, new plans for the pollinator garden at the Penn State arboretum, information about a Penn State Center for Pollinator Research collaboration to determine great pollinator plants and more.

April 1, 2016

This is the 4th of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

March 18, 2016

This is the 3rd of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.

March 11, 2016

There has been considerable discussion about the impact of pesticides – particularly neonicotinoids – on biodiversity in general and pollinator health specifically. While we have made significant progress in understanding these impacts, often missing from these discussions is whether the current neonicotinoid usage patterns actually benefit growers. As we all know (but often do not discuss), it is not simply a question of either using pesticides with no restrictions or banning them completely – the best approach is to use them in a way that maximizes the benefit while minimizing the cost to growers, consumers, and the environment.

March 10, 2016

The Zika virus outbreak has grabbed headlines and raised fears around the world. Penn State faculty member, Jason Rasgon talks about how little we know about Zika and how much we don't!

March 4, 2016

This is the 2nd of thirteen short news articles written by students, during the professional development class, about each other's research.